The 5 mistakes that all event organisers make (and how to avoid them!)

The 5 mistakes that all event organisers make (and how to avoid them!)

Organ­is­ing an event can be impact­ed by a bud­get over­run, missed sched­ul­ing or dis­sat­is­fac­tion among atten­dees due to a whole range of fac­tors relat­ed to plan­ning, com­mu­ni­ca­tion and the dis­tri­b­u­tion of avail­able resources. Here are the five most com­mon mis­takes when it comes to organ­is­ing events, and even more impor­tant­ly the solu­tions to help you avoid them.

Sum­ma­ry


Mistake no 1: Misallocating your team members’ skills.

Problem

It seems quite obvi­ous that form­ing a team is essen­tial when organ­is­ing an event. How­ev­er, a poor dis­tri­b­u­tion of skills is at the top of the list of the most com­mon mis­takes in event man­age­ment. Not recruit­ing the right peo­ple to man­age an event can lead to dis­as­ter. Even the best prepa­ra­tion in the world won’t make up for a lack of skills on D‑Day.

Solution

Event organ­is­ers need a full overview of the skills and work­load of all their staff, includ­ing sup­pli­ers and ser­vice providers, who are rarely tak­en into account when eval­u­at­ing resources, despite doing a sig­nif­i­cant amount of the work. An in-depth assess­ment at the start of the plan­ning process can pro­vide the desired overview of each individual’s skills and work­load. Once this has been done, it becomes much eas­i­er for the organ­is­er to deter­mine how to allo­cate resources among all the tasks to be car­ried out on a day-to-day basis.

Mistake no 2: Not keeping track of changes when preparing for the event.

Problem

Most events will see changes of plan of vary­ing degrees, both before and on D‑Day. Fail­ing to keep track of these changes can result in the organ­is­er los­ing con­trol of their bud­get or sched­ule.

Solution

Anno­tat­ing each step and each change in the prepa­ra­tion of an event — in an online doc­u­ment or on paper — is a sim­ple but extreme­ly effec­tive way to doc­u­ment, com­mu­ni­cate and main­tain con­trol over changes of plan. When a change of plan occurs dur­ing prepa­ra­tion — for exam­ple, a new tick­et sale or a change of cater­er — the event man­ag­er must deter­mine how this will affect the bud­get, make a note of the date, and com­mu­ni­cate the change to all those con­cerned.

Mistake no 3: Ignoring Murphy’s law.

Problem

When some­thing is like­ly to go wrong, it usu­al­ly will! To make things worse, this often hap­pens at the last minute, leav­ing every­one stunned. This is how an event can go sour while the event organ­is­er attempts dam­age con­trol — which they hadn’t planned for.

Solution

Con­duct a risk assess­ment ear­ly in the event plan­ning process. Set aside time with your team to think about what could derail the event, cause a bud­get over­run or pre­vent you from achiev­ing the desired results. Then find ways to lim­it these risks. This exer­cise doesn’t take much time and is extreme­ly use­ful for detect­ing poten­tial risks before you even begin organ­is­ing your event.

Mistake no 4: Appointing an inexperienced event manager.

Problem

Organ­is­ing events can quick­ly get out of hand with­out an event man­ag­er who is expe­ri­enced, calm and knowl­edge­able.

Solution

Hire an event man­ag­er with the expe­ri­ence required to under­stand and man­age the needs of all stake­hold­ers in your event, includ­ing you. Good event man­agers have a high lev­el of emo­tion­al intel­li­gence and can facil­i­tate plan­ning meet­ings, man­age a wide range of risks, and inter­act with mul­ti­ple stake­hold­ers. Since we don’t become expe­ri­enced overnight, sur­round your­self with these types of peo­ple if you’re start­ing out and con­sid­er them role mod­els.

Mistake no 5: Not following a plan and standard processes.

Problem

This is a much more com­mon mis­take than most event organ­is­ers imag­ine. Lack­ing a plan and a set of process­es approved by the entire organ­is­ing team increas­es the risk of tasks relat­ed to prepa­ra­tion slip­ping through the net and the event being sub­ject to last-minute unfore­seen cir­cum­stances, not fit­ting with­in the bud­get and ulti­mate­ly miss­ing a major objec­tive.

Solution

A well-defined event sched­ule that has been approved by the entire team will help the organ­is­er to tack­le each task effec­tive­ly and care­ful­ly super­vise all activ­i­ties involved in the exe­cu­tion of an event. At the same time, estab­lish­ing a set of repro­ducible process­es for scop­ing, sched­ul­ing, resource allo­ca­tion and com­mu­ni­ca­tion with stake­hold­ers allows the organ­is­er to obtain clear answers rather than vague assump­tions when mea­sur­ing the project’s progress.

Unfore­seen cir­cum­stances are part of the very com­plex process of organ­is­ing events. That’s why it’s impor­tant to lim­it mis­takes as much as pos­si­ble, espe­cial­ly when you know the solu­tions that will pre­vent them. Since 2008, Weezevent has been mak­ing life eas­i­er for organ­is­ers by devel­op­ing solu­tions that adapt to their dif­fer­ent needs. Dis­cov­er all the fea­tures of our online tick­et­ing, access con­trol, cash­less pay­ment and CRM tools by click­ing on the but­ton below:

Plan­ning an event

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